Andrew A. Biewener

Andrew A. Biewener

Charles P. Lyman Professor of Biology
Andrew Biewener

Our research focuses on the comparative biomechanics of mammalian and avian locomotion. We study the neuromuscular control of movement during walking and running, as well as during flight. Our studies are motivated by evolutionary and ecological perspectives, as well as seeking to inspire biorobotic approaches to movement. We also examine adaptive remodeling (phenotypic plasticity) and the design of musculoskeletal systems.

Recent Publications

Biewener, A. A. (2016). Locomotion as an emergent property of muscle contractile dynamics. J.Exp. Biol.219: 285-294.

Williams, C. D. and A. A. Biewener (2015). Pigeons trade efficiency for stability in response to level of challenge during confined flight. Proc.Nat. Acad. Sci.,112 (11): 3392-3396.

Moore, T. Y. C. L. Organ, S. V. Edwards, A. A. Biewener, C. J. Tabin, F. A. Jenkins Jr. and K. L. Cooper (2015). Multiple phylogenetically distinct events shaped the evolution of limb skeletal morphologies associated with bipedalism in the jerboas. Current Biology25: 2785–2794.

Ros, I. G., M. A. Badger, A. N. Pierson, L. C. Bassman and A. A. Biewener (2015). Pigeons produce aerodynamic torques through changes in wing trajectory during low speed aerial turns. J. exp. Biol., 218: 480-490. doi:10.1242/jeb.104141.

Eng, C. M., A. S. Arnold, A. A. Biewener, and D. E. Lieberman (2015). The human iliotibial band is specialized for elastic energy storage compared with the chimp fascia lata. J. exp. Biol., 218: 2382-2393.

Clifton, G. T., T. L. Hedrick and A. A. Biewener (2015). Western and Clark's grebes use novel strategies for running on water. J. exp. Biol., 218: 1235-1243.

Courses Taught

OEB 173: Comparative Biomechanics
OEB 307: Biomechanics, Physiology and Musculoskeletal Biology

Contact Information

Concord Field Station
100 Old Causeway Rd
Bedford, MA 01730

Faculty Support: Andra Hollis
Email: ahollis@oeb.harvard.edu
Phone: 781-275-1725 x102

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