Alumni News

Shayla Salzman in field with zamia

An ancient push-pull pollination mechanism in cycads

June 12, 2020

Pollination is often a mutual relationship between flowering plants and insects. Understaning how these plants entice diverse insects to pollinate has major implications across evolutionary, ecological, organismal and conservation biology. One mechanism that can provide a window into ancient insect pollination, before the rise of flowering plants, are Cycads. Cycads are primary seed-producing plants and represent one of the oldest lineages of seed plants. These plants rely on insect pollination, yet do not display the colorful visuals that signals to pollinators, which is...

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Jerboa by Haydee Gutierrez

Unpredictability Boosts Survival For Bipedal Desert Rodents

September 5, 2017

Most animals with multiple gaits change at predictable speeds. However, the Jerboas, bipedal desert rodents that use three gaits, transition between these gaits at unpredictable speeds. Talia Moore (former graduate student in Biewener and Losos labs) and Andy Biewener looked at the unpredictability of the jerboas and the benefits for survival over their quadrupedal neighbors in a new study published in...

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Green Anole Lizard by Martin de Lusenet_Flikr

How Climate Change is Impacting Natural Selection

August 3, 2017

Shane Campbell-Stanton (PhD '15, Losos and Edwards Labs), offers a rare view of natural selection in the anole lizard due to extreme weather events in a study in Science. As a graduate student, Campbell-Stanton collected DNA in 2013 from lizards in Texas and Oklahoma. Following an unusually harsh winter in 2014, he returned to the field sites to collect new DNA samples. With the before and after samples, Campbell-Staton and...

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