Postdoc News

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B v374(1763)

Biological Collections for Understanding Biodiversity in the Anthropocene

November 19, 2018

Postdoctoral researcher, Emily Meineke (Davis Lab), former postdoctoral researcher, Barnabas Daru (Davis Lab) and Prof. Charles Davis teamed with Prof. Jonathan Davies, University of British Columbia to serve as co-editors of a special issue of Philosophical Transactions B, (v374:1763). 

The special issue is dedicated to looking at the creative...

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Echidna by Mark Gillow Flickr

Researchers Look to Echidnas to Shed Light on Forelimb Evolution in Mammals

November 14, 2018

Mammals use their forelimbs for many activities including swimming, jumping, flying, climbing and digging. But how they evolved to do so is a mystery for scientists. Postdoc, Sophie Regnault (S. Pierce Lab) and Prof. Stephanie Pierce studied a highly-detailed musculoskeletal model of an echidna forelimb to shed light on how extinct mammals might have used their forelimbs. Echidnas are egg-laying mammals with many anatomical features in common with earlier mammal ancestors and can help bridge the gap between extinct and other...

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James Crall QR Code Tagged Bees for Science Magazine

Pesticide Exposure Disrupts Bumblebee Nest Behavior

November 9, 2018

Postdoc, James Crall joined former PhD student, Callin Switzer ('17, Hopkins Lab) and OEB professors, Benjamin de Bivort and Naomi Pierce to investigate the effects of neonicotinoid pesticides on the bumblebee's nest behavior. Previous studies showed the pesticides reduced colony size, but how the reduction occurred was not known. In their study published in Science...

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Illustration showing an early mammal relative, Thrinaxodon, which was part of the first group to have an extra fourth section of their backbones. Credit: April Neander  Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-09-mammal-spine-scientists.html#jCp

What Makes a Mammal a Mammal? Our Spine!

September 21, 2018

A new study led by postdoctoral researcher, Katrina Jones (S. Pierce Lab) and Stephanie Pierce suggests the makeup of a spine is one more characteristic that defines a mammal. The research, published in the September 21 issue of Science, shows mammal backbones are different than the vertebra of most four-legged animals in that it is made up of different sections - neck, thorax, and lower back - that take on different shapes and...

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Derek Bok Center

Spring 2018 Derek Bok Certificate of Distinction in Teaching

September 19, 2018

Congratulations to OEB graduate students, postdocs and associates awarded the spring 2018 Derek Bok Certificate of Distinction in Teaching!

Graduate Students: Izzy Baker (MCB 64), Meghan Blumstein (OEB 50), Liming Cai (OEB 103), Blake Dickson (OEB 217R), Nathan Edelman (OEB 230), Morgan Furze (OEB 52), Phillip Grayson (OEB 50), Nicholas Herrmann (OEB 57), Miriam Johnston (OEB 157), Vanessa Knutson (OEB 51), Mara Laslo (OEB 167), Avantika Mainieri (OEB 57), Anju Manandhar (ESPP 90Y), Ya Min (OEB 52), Sofia Prado-Irwin (OEB 167), Jonathan Schmitt (OEB 190...

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Texas Wildflowers by Kathy Kimpel, flickr

The Mechanistic Link Between Two Types of Pollen Rejection Systems

July 11, 2018

Postdoctoral Researcher, Federico Roda (Hopkins Lab) investigated the mechanistic link between a plants ability to reject its own pollen and to reject pollen from another species. By performing over 5000 controlled crosses in a group of native Texas wildflowers, Roda and Prof. Hopkins found these two types of pollen rejection systems were highly correlated across individuals and occurred at the same time during pollen development. The study published in...

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Image: Texas Wildflowers by Bill Staney, Flickr

The Evolution of Barriers to Reproduction Between Species

May 18, 2018

The process of species formation involves the evolution of barriers to reproduction between closely related taxa. Sevan Suni’s (Hopkins lab) study in Evolution quantified these barriers between three closely related Texas wildflowers. The study describes patterns in the strength of these barriers to reproduction between species and uses these patterns to understand the evolutionary forces that drive the process of...

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New Spider Family Tree Tries to Untangle the Evolution of Webs

New Spider Family Tree Tries to Untangle the Evolution of Webs

April 27, 2018

A long-running and fiercely debated question among scientists "Did spiders evolve to spin the orb web only once? Or multiple times?" may have an answer in a new study in Current Biology, led by a team of researchers including Gonzalo Giribet and postdoctoral fellow, Rosa Fernández. The research team compared approximately 2,500 genes from 159...

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