2019

Image from Molecular Cell

CRISPR Enzyme Programmed to Kill Viruses in Human Cells

October 11, 2019

Pardis Sabeti and researchers at the Broad Institute have turned a CRISPR RNA-cutting enzyme into an antiviral that can be programmed to detect and destroy RNA-based viruses in human cells. Many of the world's most common or deadly pathogens are RNA-based viruses. The study in Molecular Cell is the first to harness CAS 13 enzyme, or any CRISPR system, as an antiviral in cultured human cells....

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Images courtesy of Harvard SEAS & Lori K. Sanders

Shape-shifting Structures Take The Form of A face, Antenna

October 7, 2019

Prof. L Mahadevan and researchers with the Harvard Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering have created the most complex shape-shifting structures to date -- lattices composed of multiple materials that grow or shrink in response to changes in temperature. The team printed flat lattices that shape morph into a frequency-shifting antenna or the face of pioneering mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss in response to a change in temperature. The study is published in the...

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8-cell embryo, three days after fertilization (WikiCommons)

How Early-Stage Embryos Maintain Their Size

September 2, 2019

Prof. L. Mahadevan collaborated with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) to discover what controls the size of an embryo. The study published in Nature found that embryos maintain an average size in early development through simple hydraulic pressure. During early stages of embryonic development, a fluid-filled cavity grows and expands. Using mouse embryos, researchers observed that the cavity repeated the process...

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Illustration of protein aggregation

Using Math to Help Treat Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other Diseases

August 15, 2019

L. Mahadevan's latest study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences offers insight into treatments for diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other diseases in which protein aggregation (misfolded proteins clump together) is implicated. While the role of protein aggregation is not fully understood, many current treatments target the aggregation process. However, finding the right treatment protocols for these drugs is challenging....

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Samantha Lin

In Memory of Samantha Lin '16

August 6, 2019
It is with great sadness that we report the death of OEB undergraduate alum Samantha (Sam) Lin '16. Sam was a wonderful student and a hugely valued member of the OEB community. From Harvard, she went on to Veterinary School at North Carolina State University, where she was due to graduate next year. Our thoughts are with Sam's family and friends, and with the many OEB-ers affected by this awful tragedy.... Read more about In Memory of Samantha Lin '16
Belugas in Water with Topography of Animals Ridges

How Smooth Is A Dolphin?

July 17, 2019

Dolphin skin has long inspired research on drag reduction mechanisms due to the presence of skin ridges that could reduce fluid resistance. Prof. George Lauder and PhD student, Dylan Wainwright (Lauder Lab) collected in vivo three-dimensional surface data on the skin from five species of odontocetes (cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth) to quantitatively examine skin texture, including the presence and size of ridges.

Lauder, Wainwright and team molded the skin of live...

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Rosella Gabriellus fossil

Javier Ortega-Hernández and Rudy-Lerosey Aubril Awarded William F. Milton Fund

July 15, 2019

Congratulations to Javier Ortega-Hernández and Rudy-Lerosey Aubril (Research Associate, Ortega-Hernández lab) awarded the William F. Milton Fund for their project, "Revealing the nearshore cradle of animal evolution: a new exceptionally preserved soft-bodied fossil biota from the early Cambrian of British Columbia.

The award will support the study of a new...

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