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CAPTURE Artist Interpretation

CAPTUREing Whole-Body 3D movements

December 18, 2020

In the last decade, Neuroscientists have made major advances in their quest to study the brain. They can assemble complete wiring diagrams and catalogue the brain's many cell types. They've developed electrode arrays for recording electrical activity in individual neurons and placed itty bitty microscopes on the heads of mice to visualize their brain activity. However, almost shockingly, there are no tools to precisely measure the brain's principal output -- behavior - in freely moving animals.

Animal behavior is important to a broad range of disciplines, from neuroscience and...

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Micrograph showing Rothia cells (light blue) in their native habitat, a bacterial biofilm scraped from the human tongue.  Photo credit: Jessica Mark Welch, Marine Biological Laboratory.

The Incredible, Variable Bacteria Living in Your Mouth

December 16, 2020

Bacteria often show very strong biogeography – some bacteria are abundant in specific locations while absent from others – leading to major questions when applying microbiology to therapeutics or probiotics: how did the bacteria get into the wrong place? How do we add the right bacteria into the right place when the biogeography has gotten ‘out of whack’? These questions, though, have one big obstacle, bacteria are so tiny and numerous with very diverse and complicated populations which creates major challenges to understanding which subgroups of bacteria live...

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Thin section of a partial gorgonopsian canine under polarized light. Serrations are evident on the right side of this specimen. Courtesy of Megan Whitney

Researchers discover surprising connection between prehistoric dinosaurs and mammals in their teeth

December 15, 2020

When most people think of ferocious, blade-like teeth on prehistoric creatures they picture Smilodon, better known as the saber-toothed tiger. But in the world of dinosaurs, theropods are well known for having blade-like teeth with serrated cutting edges used for biting and ripping their prey. And until recently, the complex arrangement of tissues that gave rise to these terrifying teeth was considered unique to these meat-eating dinosaurs.

In a paper published December 16 in ...

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